The New South Wales South Coast

This sub-adult male Satin Bowerbird was photographed in one of the gardens on the New South Wales south coast
Male Satin Bowerbird (6 or 7 years old)

Although we did not have a lot of time on this trip, we found a huge variety of awesome wildlife in the 250 km stretch of the New South Wales south coast immediately south of Sydney.

The New South Wales south coast is not only a very scenic part of Australia, but it yielded some great sightings and photographic opportunities of a wide variety of wildlife, including: Eastern Grey Kangaroo, White-bellied Sea-Eagle, Yellow-tailed Black-Cockatoo, Australian Pelican, Red-necked Wallaby, Sooty Oystercatcher, Satin Bowerbird, King Parrot, Crimson Rosella, Laughing Kookaburra and Eastern Water Dragon.

Just Down the Road

By Australian terms, 250 km is “just down the road”, which is something you need to be very mindful of when asking Australians for directions! Given that we were visiting a few places along the way, this 250 km drive took us around two days, but we were busy researching the best places to go, so that it doesn’t take you that long.

One of the species we were delighted to find in good numbers was the Sooty Oystercatcher. This species is classed as vulnerable in New south Wales, but is less threatened elsewhere in Australia.

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Sooty Oystercatchers

In one of the places we went toward the southern end of our trip we found Eastern Grey Kangaroos is very plentiful numbers, and they would almost let you pat them. In fact, Aniket had one young Kangaroo come so close that its nose almost touched the lens of his camera! You can see that picture on our Facebook or Instagram page.

Eastern Grey Kangaroos are a common site on the New South Wales south coast
Eastern Grey Kangaroo

We had a great time on the New South Wales south coast, seeing and photographing over 75 species of birds, three mammals and two reptiles in just 2 days which is a great total in such a short time-frame. We will be detailing our ‘hot spots’ in the New South Wales book.