Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoo

Carnaby's Cockatoo
Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo

What does it look like? Also known as the Short-billed Black-Cockatoo, the Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoo is easily confused with the Baudin’s (or Long-billed) Black-Cockatoo Zanda baudinii, which has a longer upper mandible, although this can often be partially obscured by feathers. Both are large black cockatoos with a white cheek patch and white panels in the tail. The male of both species has a pinkish eye-ring.

Where does it live? It is endemic to south-western Western Australia.

What are its habitats and habits? The species is regarded as endangered, due to its low numbers and loss of large areas of feeding and breeding habitat. It prefers woodlands, shrublands and heaths and feeds on seeds of hakeas, eucalypts, she-oaks and pines, but will also enter commercial orchards to feed on fruits and nuts. It nests in tree hollows, and two eggs are laid in a clutch. Pairs form lifelong bonds.

Scientific name: Zanda latirostris

Size: 54-56cm

Do you want to know the best places to go to see this species? Check out our book “Australia’s Birdwatching Megaspots” – available for purchase through our secure online store