Fantails

Fantails are small, active insectivores, with a conspicuous broadly fan-shaped tail. None of the five species recorded in Australia are endemic. The Lord Howe Grey Fantail Rhipidura fuliginosa cervina is listed as extinct. The Willie Wagtail R. leucophrys is one of the best known and widespread birds in Australia.

Scientific name: Rhipiduridae (family)

Magpie-lark

Grallina cyanoleuca Also called the Peewee, the Magpie-lark is confined to Australasia. The alternative name has arisen from its harsh “pee-o-wit” or “pee-wee” call. During the breeding season, birds often sit side by side and call alternately, each raising and lowering their  wings as they do so. The bold black and white markings also assist in identification. Male birds differ from females ...

Northern Fantail

Rhipidura rufiventris Also known as the Timor Fantail, this species has a large range that includes Australia, PNG and Indonesia. Within Australia it is found in lowland tropical and subtropical forests, dense vine thickets, mangrove fringes and some woodlands from north-western WA to north-eastern Qld. Unlike other fantails, it does not display the typical fanned tail and constant activity, instead...

Rufous Fantail

Within Australia, there are five species of fantail.  Of these, the Rufous Fantail is undoubtedly the most colourful.  Its range extends in a broad coastal band from the Kimberleys, Western Australia, through northern and eastern Australia to western Victoria.  The Rufous Fantail prefers the wetter forest and woodlands, and is a familiar sight in rainforest, dense eucalypt forest and mangroves.  Sim...