Gulls & Terns

Laridae

Thirty-five species have been recorded in Australia, of which on the Pacific Gull Larus pacificus is endemic. Of the 11 gulls, the only other breeding species are the Silver Gull Chroicocephalus novaehollandiae   and Kelp Gull L. dominicanus. Several of the 23 terns breed in Australia, while others occur as regular non-breeding visitors or as vagrants.

Crested Tern

Crested Tern

What does it look like?  In coastal areas, this medium-sized tern, with robust yellow bill, grey wings and back, white neck and underparts, and scraggy black crest, is perhaps the most commonly seen tern in Australia.  In size, it is the second largest Australian species, second only to the Caspian Tern, which measures 50 to 55 cm, and has a huge red bill.  The similar Lesser Crested Tern, found in...
Pacific Gull

Pacific Gull

What does it look like?  This is a large gull. The back and wings are black and the head, neck and underparts are white. The white tail, with a broad black band towards the tip, and large yellow bill with red tip, distinguish it from the otherwise similar Kelp Gull Larus dominicus . Young birds are predominantly dark brown and buff in plumage, the yellow bill becoming visible after the first year. ...
Silver Gull

Silver Gull

What does it look like?  This is the smallest of the resident Australian gulls.  In adult birds the plumage is grey above, with a white head, neck and underparts; younger birds have varying amounts of brown mottling on the back and wings.  Adult birds also differ from the young in having conspicuous red-orange legs, bill and eye-ring; these are black to brown in younger birds. Where does it live?  Th...