Honeyeaters & Chats

Meliphagidae

The honeyeaters are largely arboreal and, while there is considerable diversity in size, almost all have slender, decurved beaks. The chats are more terrestrial with shorter, more pointed beaks. The tongue is bifurcate and brush-tipped. Seventy-three species have been recorded in Australia; of these 59 are endemic.. Honeyeaters can be found in almost every habitat and location in the country.

Crescent Honeyeater

Phylidonyris pyrrhopterus A small to medium-sized honeyeater (14 to 16 cm). The male is dark grey above, paler and more grey-brown below, with a broad yellow patch on each wing and side of tail and a darker blackish crescent-shaped marking down each side of the white breast. The throat is also white. The female is duller and more brown than the male. Similar species include the New Holland Honeyeater...

Crimson Chat

The brilliant crimson, white and black plumage of this male chat  is diagnostic. Females and immatures are drab in comparison, being brownish and having a washed out redness on the rump and breast. Another red-coloured bird with which it could be confused is the Red-capped Robin Petroica goodenovii . Much time is spent feeding on the ground and in low shrubbery. It is frequently seen in loose flocks, ...

Lewin's Honeyeater

Meliphaga lewinii This honeyeater has dark greenish grey colouration, interrupted only by the creamy yellow of the gape and the yellowish crescent-shaped patch on the ear coverts. The sexes are similar in appearance. It is mostly frugivorous, eating berries and small fruits, but also takes insects and some nectar. The strong rattling notes of the Lewin’s Honeyeater carry long distances and instantly c...

Red Wattlebird

Anthochaera carunculata The Red Wattlebird gets its name from a fleshy reddish wattle on the side of the neck.  This is found only in this species, although it is often difficult to see. Besides this, the bird can be identified by its grey-brown body, boldly streaked with white, yellow belly and long, white-tipped tail. The smaller Little Wattlebird is somewhat similar in plumage, but lacks the ...

Regent Honeyeater

Anthochaera phrygia Once known as the Warty Bird, due to warty patch of yellowish facial skin around its eyes. The plumage is striking, with a distinctive black hood, and the black body feathers broadly edged with yellow and white, giving a scalloped appearance, and bright yellow panels in the feathers of the wings and tail. The Regent Honeyeater is strongly nomadic, moving northwards in the autumn...

Strong-billed Honeyeater

Melithreptus validirostris Slightly bigger than the similar Black-headed Honeyeater M. affinis , which is the only other member of this genus to be found in Tasmania. Both are endemic to the island. The Strong-billed Honeyeater is distinguished by its black head, with a broad white band around the nape, starting at the rear of each eye, and black patch below the bill. The back is olive green...

White-plumed Honeyeater

The White-plumed Honeyeater is common and familiar throughout the majority of the Australian Mainland.  Although the intensity of the overall colouration may change slightly throughout its wide range, it is predominantly olive-grey on the body with a paler yellow-olive face.  The name is derived from a conspicuous white line, edged with black, which is visible at the base of the cheek.  The bill is...

Yellow Wattlebird

Anthochaera paradoxa The Yellow Wattlebird is Tasmania’s unofficial bird emblem and is Australia’s largest honeyeater. Endemic to Tasmania, the Yellow Wattlebird inhabits mainly the eastern and central areas of the mainland and also King Island, where it feeds on insects and nectar. It is characterised by the long orange-yellow wattle that descends from each cheek and very long, graduated tai...