Plovers & Dotterels

Charadriidae

Of the 20 species recorded in Australia, the Hooded Plover Thinornis cucullatus , Black-fronted Dotterel Elseyornis melanops, Red-kneed Dotterel Erythrogonys cinctus and Inland Dotterel Charadrius australis are the only endemics. Thirteen of the remaining 16 occur in Australia as non-breeding migrants (six) or vagrants (seven). Variable, but typically small to medium, terrestrial feeders, associated with aquatic areas and damp grasslands.

Black-fronted Dotterel

Black-fronted Dotterel

What does it look like?  This small wader is a breeding resident in Australia. When observed it is easily identified by its white underparts and distinct black Y-shaped band which extends across the chest, around to the base of the neck and through the eye to the forehead (this may be absent in younger birds). The Black-fronted Dotterel has an orange-red bill, tipped with black, and it has a conspicuous ...
Hooded Plover

Hooded Plover

What does it look like?  The adult Hooded Plover is unmistakable, with its black head, orange eyering and two-toned orange and black bill. The upperparts are brown and the underparts are white, with a black streak across the hindneck and down on to the chest. Young birds can be distinguished from other similar shorebirds by their orange eyering and the typical head-bobbing behaviour that plovers ...
Red-capped Plover

Red-capped Plover

What does it look and sound like?  This is a small shorebird. Brown above, reddish on the crown and nape, and with a white face and underparts, the Red-capped Plover cannot be confused with any other shorebird regularly found in Australia. The vagrant Kentish Plover C. alexandrinus has a white collar around the nape. The call is a faintly trilled ‘tik’ or ‘twink’. Where does it live?  It is a c...