Eared Seals

Otariidae

Seals come to shore to bask, sleep, mate and give birth, and appear somewhat cumbersome when on land, but they are truly at home in the water and superbly adapted for their semi-aquatic life.

Long-nosed Fur-seal

Arctocephalus forsteri TL 1.5–2.5m (New Zealand Fur-seal)   What does it look like? Thickset with long, narrow, pointed snout. Brown to blackish-grey, flecked with silvery-white, paler on chest and flanks, and snout light greyish or brownish with long, pale grey whiskers. Male has longer fur (mane) on neck, heavily streaked with silvery-grey. Where is it found? Southern c...

Australian Fur-seal

Arctocephalus pusillus TL 1.36–2.27m (Cape Fur-seal) What does it look like? Adult males much larger than females and young males, grey-brown (darker with age), with long silvery mane of coarse hair on neck and shoulders. Females more slender, silvery-grey above and brownish below, becoming more yellowish on chest and throat. Where is it found? Coast and islands along southern Australia, a...

Australian Sea-lion

Neophoca cinerea TL 1.3–2.25m What does it look like? Adult male larger than female, with thickened neck and chest. Coat (pelage) brown to blackish (becoming darker with age), and paler whitish-brown on head and nape. Adult female and young male silvery-grey above and yellowish-cream below. Rear flippers move independently. Snout blunt. Where is it found? Southern Australia, breeding o...