True Bugs

Order: Hemiptera

Very large order with 119 families, containing over 6,000 species found in Australia. Split into four suborders, largest being Heteroptera with 67 families in Australia, followed by Sternorrhyncha with 29 families, then Auchenorrhyncha with 21 families and Coleorrhyncha, which contains a single family. Extremely variable in both size (1 to 110mm) and colour, with some species among the most brightly coloured and spectacularly patterned of all insects. Wings, if present, cross over when at rest, and wingless species typically live under protective coverings. All species have sucking, tubelike mouthparts. Some families can be direct pests of humans, such as bed bugs, which are external parasites of humans, typically within crowded situations and residences with poor hygiene, and assassin bugs, which can carry disease-causing pathogens. Others, such as aphids, are pests of crops and flower gardens.

Redeye

Redeye

What does it look like? The Redeye Cicada has a dark brown to black body, grey-silver patches either side of abdomen, with striking bright red eyes. Wing veins black with clear membranes. Where does it live? south-eastern Australia from SE QLD to South Australia, Tasmania What are its habitats and habits? The Redeye, or Cherry Eye, occurs in sclerophyll forest...
Water Strider

Water Strider

What does it look like?  The Water Strider has a dark brown body with pale stripes, pale legs, rear two pairs of legs very long and slender. Adults have winged and wingless forms. Where does it live? North-eastern Australia, Papua New Guinea, Melanesia, Polynesia. What are its habitats and habits? The Water Strider occurs in freshwater, from lakes and ponds to streams and hot springs. The modified ...